Degree Requirements – Law

Foundations

  • 1st year composition (ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or ENGL 109H, or ENGL 107 and ENGL 108, or equivalent transfer courses)
  • Math 112 or higher, or equivalent transfer courses (math substitutions not accepted)
  • 4th semester second language proficiency required

General Education

  • 6 units Tier 1 Individuals & Societies – 150
  • 6 units Tier 1 Traditions & Cultures – 160
  • 6 units Tier 1 Natural Sciences – 170
     
  • 3 units Tier 2 Arts
  • 3 units Tier 2 Humanities
  • 3 units Tier 2 Natural Sciences
  • 3 units Diversity

Minor

A minor is required for this program. Minors typically are 18-21 units.

See list of UA minor options

Introductory Courses

  • Complete 12 units total

Required course:

General survey of the constitutional bases, organization, and functioning of the American national government; recent and current trends.

Choose two courses:

Study of the international system, its actors and their capabilities; ends and means of foreign policy; international tension, conflict, and cooperation.
Basic issues in political thought, with emphasis on contemporary problems of democracy, liberty, authority, obligation, and ideology.
Survey of the major political systems and analysis of comparative political concepts, with a view to preparation for more advanced study.
Theory and practice of executive agencies, including policy making and other functions, processes, personnel and fiscal management, and administrative law.
Focus on the politics of diversity and inclusion in a fast-changing world. Attention to national-ethnic, racial, gender, sexual orientation, religious, and socioeconomic factors, among others, that underlie human diversity and the political conditions for cooperation, conflict, and well-being. Consideration of decision-making and political-institutional settings that may extend from the local and regional to the national and international.

One 3 unit SGPP elective to be chosen in consultation with your advisor.

Law Core Courses

  • 12 units total
This course explores the legal process and procedures followed in our systems of civil and criminal justice. Topics will include the components of due process, adversarial legalism and the roles of attorneys, judges, prosecutors, and professional ethics, and the core elements of civil and criminal systems
The American Common Law System I is one of two courses which conveys what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology and as a reflection and commentary on the history and politics of the American experience, from the early colonial period to the 21st century world of globalized commerce, human rights concerns and environmental and social justice. The course examines the history and sources of the common law, common law modes of legal rhetoric, argument, and communication skills and transformation and adaptation of the common law achieved through social justice...
The American Common Law System II is one of two courses which conveys what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology and as a reflection and commentary on the history and politics of the American experience, from the early colonial period to the 21st century world of globalized commerce, human rights concerns and environmental and social justice. The course examines the history and sources of the common law, common law modes of legal rhetoric, argument, and communication skills and transformation and adaptation of the common law achieved through social justice...
Broadly speaking, public law is concerned with the organization of government and the relationship between the government and its citizens. In the United States, the foundation of public law is the Constitution, but that document merely provides a framework, which later legislatures, presidents, and courts have filled in over time. This course introduces students to the law that has emerged from those efforts and the distinctive modes of argument lawyers and judges employ in shaping that law for the future. Subjects covered include the constitutional law of federalism; executive power,...

Law Electives

  • Choose two courses (6 units)
  • A maximum of 3 units of intenrship credit may be used toward this requirement (with a maximum of 6 units of internship credit toward the overall major requirements)
This is a 3-credit, interdisciplinary course that combines legal, art and design concepts to explore: (1) what are legal rights; (2) how do we communicate legal rights; (3) how do we navigate legal processes; (4) how can art and design inform how legal rights and legal information are conveyed, in order to empower people and make legal systems more accessible and navigable?
This course is an introduction to selected substantive, procedural, historical, and institutional aspects of the law. Ultimately, it is about critical thinking and clear communication. Student will be provided with a rigorous understanding of the ways that rhetoric, argument, fallacies, values, and evidence are deployed in deciding fundamental social questions, using 15 cases from the United States Supreme Court as specimen. After hearing argument and analysis from leading legal scholars in their fields, students will engage in facilitated small-group discussions and complete intensive...
A special topics seminar for Honors-active juniors and seniors preparing to undertake a LAW thesis. Course may include small group discussion, legal research, guest speakers, and presentations on a variety of department-related topics of interest. Honors sophomores may enroll with consent of the department.
Legal advocacy is fundamentally about effectively telling stories. Both inside and outside the courtroom, stories shape our experience of justice. Visual storytelling commands a unique power to evoke empathy and to serve as a powerful tool for public awareness and advocacy. Working collaboratively with faculty (an Instructor/Filmmaker and a Clinical Professor of Law), students will create a short documentary film about a social justice topic currently undertaken by one of the College of Law's clinics. In addition to making a short film, the class will embark on a journey of "media...
This course will teach students how to find legal authorities relevant to legal problems; how to analyze a legal issue using facts and law; and how to communicate legal analysis logically and concisely. This course consists of research exercises; writing exercises, including letters and legal memoranda; and more complex research and writing assignments. Students will work in groups and individually to learn the fundamentals of good writing and editing skills.
Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts associated with modern day agricultural industries to help them understand legal concepts as well as public policy that affects the commodities markets, natural resources in their "raw form", consumer attitudes, and market forces that affect various agribusiness industries of the west. Students will receive exposure to the framework of the United States legal system, with a brief review of the three distinct branches of government and how each branch impacts the development of law and policy as related to the production agriculture. The...
This course surveys the law governing business organizations. We examine the fundamental legal characteristics of the six most common U.S. business forms: sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies. Topics include formation, management, liability exposure, fiduciary duties, financing, and taxation.
In this survey course on human rights law, students will gain a foundation in sources of law, enforcement mechanisms, and fundamental human rights derived from international law. Using case studies, decisions and commentary by governmental and non-governmental bodies, scholarly writings, and policy work and featuring human rights advocates and experts, this course will provide students with a basic understanding of human rights legal principles and processes to enable them to apply these concepts to current events and human rights abuses occurring globally.
In this survey course on human rights law, students will gain a foundation in sources of law, enforcement mechanisms, and fundamental human rights derived from international law. Using case studies, decisions and commentary by governmental and non-governmental bodies, scholarly writings, and policy work and featuring human rights advocates and experts, this course will provide students with a basic understanding of human rights legal principles and processes to enable them to apply these concepts to current events and human rights abuses occurring globally.
Explores the place and status of Tribal Governments in our federal system, focusing in particular on federal policy decisions underlying various laws and statutes. The course examines ways to interpret and apply the relevant laws and explores the impact that would be result from changing the policy behind those laws.
For many years, but particularly since September 11, 2001, international law and international relations have had a major impact on every American, whether the issue is terrorism; the use of force by the United States and its allies; addressing climate change or mitigating world poverty. This course on public international law will provide an introduction to such subjects as treaties and other sources of international law; international law in the United States; principal international organizations; concepts of sovereignty, statehood and territoriality; the bases for jurisdiction; state...
This is a survey of the four major parts of "Health Law": (1) Regulation, Finance, and Policy; (2) Medical Liability; (3) Bioethics; and (4) Public Health. Part (1) relates to how we do, could, and should regulate and finance the medical industry, aka the Medical Industrial Complex, which makes up around 17 percent of our gross domestic product. It is the biggest economic sector of our economy. The major law, among a complex web of laws, that regulates this Complex, is the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("ACA") - sometimes referred to as "Obama Care." Part (2) relates to how...
This course will introduce students to the basic legal and administrative structure of the U.S. immigration system. We will consider how the law determines who may enter the country lawfully, what rights immigrants have once in the country, and on what grounds they can be forced to leave and return to their home countries. As the class progresses, we will build on this legal framework to consider several of the policy debates regarding immigration that currently embroil the nation. In discussing possible policy reforms, we will consider a broad range of perspectives, drawing on academic...
This three-credit survey course analyzes the major legal issues in international trade law, including intellectual property and foreign investment law. The principal areas of coverage are: (1) the GATT/World Trade Organization agreements and regional trade agreements such as North American Free Trade Agreement and the Trans-Pacific Partnership; (2) the protection of intellectual property; and (3) problems of international investment, including dispute resolution through investor-state arbitration. The course is intended to introduce students to the legal and policy aspects of these...
This is a foundational course in environmental law and regulatory policy. The course will focus on the concepts underlying approaches to protecting the environment, using the common law and various environmental statutes primarily as examples of the different approaches to environmental protection. The course will emphasize pollution control law by studying the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The course will also study liability for contamination through a more detailed study of the Superfund law. The course will also discuss the...
The Intellectual Property course provides an examination of trade secrets, trademarks, patents, and copyrights as methods of protecting creative works. Differences and similarities among these types of protection are analyzed. Licensing and transfer of rights are explored, and remedies for infringements of rights are examined. Rights and issues related to works created by independent contractors, and work-for-hire agreements are also addressed.
Long before civil or criminal law, religious systems regulated families of a wide variety of shapes and sizes. And long before religious systems, people were forming families. Families have been a fundamental social institution since the dawn of humankind. This course will explore the relationship between modern American law and the oldest and most basic societal association - the family. We will look how law deals with evolving concepts of family, with the intersection of religion and law as it relates to family, and with the government's interest in particular families and in...
Employment Law introduces students to the major legal concepts underlying employment in the United States at both the federal and state levels. The course will provide an overview of the different employer/employee relationships, employment torts, privacy rights, discrimination laws, and federal compensation laws. Students will focus on the basics of legal reasoning in the employment context, prevention of legal risk, and solid professional practice.
Criminal law serves a critical function in society. This course will concentrate on the fundamental concepts of substantive criminal law. Students will be engaged in analysis and discussion of theories of punishment and the basic elements of criminal liability and responsibility. The course will cover criminal offenses, defenses to criminal liability and related policy arguments. Topical subjects as mandatory sentencing, capital punishment and the insanity defense will be examined. Students will participate in classroom role playing as advocates on topical criminal law subjects such as...
This course is a hands-on introduction to legislative analysis and drafting using current, pending legislation. The course will provide the context for the legislative process, covering members of Congress, party leadership, congressional committees, and other actors who influence legislative policy. Students will learn how to analyze and draft legislation, as well as related policy documents such as position papers, floor statements, correspondence, and talking points. This course will introduce students to researching and analyzing legislation in a manner that is useful to the intended...
This course is a hands-on introduction to legislative analysis and drafting using current, pending legislation. The course will provide the context for the legislative process, covering members of Congress, party leadership, congressional committees, and other actors who influence legislative policy. Students will learn how to analyze and draft legislation, as well as related policy documents such as position papers, floor statements, correspondence, and talking points. This course will introduce students to researching and analyzing legislation in a manner that is useful to the intended...
This course examines the legal procedures governing the investigation and arrest phases of criminal cases, guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution. The tensions between public safety, national security, and privacy rights will be discussed. The course will also feature current, topical cases and guest speakers.
Welcome to Information Privacy! This course will explore a range of contexts in which the courts and other branches of government have attempted to give definition to a legal right to privacy. The right to privacy is puzzling. It must coexist with other countervailing policies like free speech, law enforcement, national security, and public access to government records. Though the right to privacy has never had fixed definition, privacy law is in a particularly important period of development right now. Courts and policymakers are grappling with the rules that ought to govern the...
Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice of a legal nature in actual service in a technical, business, governmental or non-profit establishment.
Students can obtain credit for a 400-level Congressional Internship by working for a member of US Congress or Committee within Washington, DC or state offices. Students are highly encouraged to complete LAW 461- Legislative Analysis before applying for a Congressional Internship.
Specialized work for University Honors students on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Working experience at the Arizona State Legislature; responsibilities draw upon a student's area of major expertise and include preparing written and oral reports, summarizing legislative proposals, and providing information to legislators and legislative committees. Selected students will participate through one of four assignments based in Phoenix from January-May: - Support State Senators and legislative staff at the Arizona State Senate - Support State Representatives and legislative staff at the Arizona House of Representatives - Assist policy advisors and executive staff in the...
An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.

Political Science Electives

  • Choose two courses (6 units)
  • A maximum of 3 units of intenrship credit may be used toward this requirement (with a maximum of 6 units of internship credit toward the overall major requirements)
Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice of a legal nature in actual service in a technical, business, governmental or non-profit establishment.
Analysis of selected principles of criminal law, criminal procedure and correctional law.
Policy makers have long struggled to regulate intoxicating substances, including alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and opioids. While some of these substances are widely used for recreational or medicinal purposes, they can have significant deleterious effects on both the individual and societal levels. Furthermore, although evidence suggests that some policies to limit consumption of these substances may improve social welfare, other policies may unintentionally exacerbate societal inequality and cause further harms to public health and safety. In this course, we will analyze the various...
Examines the treatment of juveniles and women in the American criminal justice system.
This course is about crime and misconduct in organizations, how much there is, what it is like and what the government can and cannot do about it.  The readings, topics and discussions blend theory and research with current examples of white collar crime.
Structure, function, and processes of the "third branch" of the American government.
Western political theory from the Utilitarians through the 1930s.
Exploration of classic and contemporary philosophical issues about law and morality. Topics covered will vary but may include, among others, the limits of social interference with individual liberty, legal paternalism and physician-assisted suicide, legal moralism, freedom of speech and expression, legal punishment and capital punishment, and civil disobedience.
This course will introduce students to political psychology, with an emphasis on how psychology may be used to understand mass political behavior, political movements, race and intergroup conflict, and attitude change.
This course is about understanding, initiating and analyzing political sciences based experimental research. It will require students to work independently and coordinate with groups to create and present experimental data and methodology.
Students will learn about public opinion, including how it is measured and what is its role in a democratic country.   In addition, students will learn what leads people to hold specific opinions.
In a democracy, the public's role centers on elections.  In this course we will examine four main topics.  First, we will attempt to answer the question of 'Who Votes?' by examining patterns in political participation.  Second, we will look at the choices of these voters in selecting between the Democratic and Republican candidates.  Third, we will see how voting behavior varies across election settings:  presidential elections, congressional elections, and primary elections.  Finally, we will take an in-depth look at partisanship, the core attitude that influences participation and...
Nature and validity of law; law and morality, judicial reasoning, law and liberty.
The motivating question for this course is whether or not significant social, political, and/or economic change can be achieved through the courts.
Development and analysis of constitutional law of the U.S.; problems of distribution of powers.
Analysis of the constitutional guarantees of civil liberties in the U.S.
The evolving relationship between law and religion has had a profound influence on American political life and discourse since the country's founding. This course is designed to develop familiarity with that history and the resulting major tenets of the First Amendment's religion clauses. Taking as our starting point the concept of the separation of church and state, we examine what this idea has meant in U.S. Constitutional law. Class time will be structured around in-depth study of the Constitution and of Supreme Court precedents, and will integrate these formative Supreme Court...
Legal status of women in America, including constitutional protections, marriage and family relationships, educational and vocational opportunities, political rights, criminal law.

Additional Elective

  • Choose one course (3 units) from the list of Law and Political Science electives above.